Tag Archive for Review

Dethroning Mammon: Making Money Serve Grace

On Good Friday, a review of the Archbishop of Canterbury’s Lent Book for 2017It does not take long to see what matters most in our society: the bottom line is the proverbial dollar. Watch the news for more than a few minutes and you’ll discover it’s the economics that drives political decisions. Does it have to…

Night Trains by Andrew Martin

More than nostalgia for a quickly vanishing way of travelAndrew Martin’s Night Trains is a compelling piece of travel writing. Part documentary account of his own travels and – perhaps inevitably given its subject – part social history, this is not mere trainspotter fodder. All over Europe, sleeper trains are rapidly vanishing. While rail travel is…

Not only a ‘Shepherd’s Life’

James Rebanks’ ‘The Shepherd’s Life’ is much more than a conventional biography, challenging us to rethink our attitudes to the landWe spend a lower percentage of our incomes on food than ever but what we eat dominates the media, whether it be this year’s winner of The Great British Bake Off,  Tesco’s latest marketing rip…

A little dribble from Bryson

Cover of The Road to Little Dribbling

Bill Bryson’s latest round Britain book verges on the formulaic, but it has some pointed observationsBill Bryson has written some enjoyable books: Mother Tongue is an informed, witty introduction to the English language; Notes from a Small Island, some twenty years ago, was an amusing (if formulaic) homage to his adopted country of Britain. And he has…

A Scottish ‘Ulysses’?

Lanark by Alasdair Gray

Alasdair Gray’s novel ‘Lanark’ is an astonishing achievement, and well worth the huge time investment to read it… This will be a long post, but then Alasdair Gray’s Lanark is, like James Joyce’s Ulysses, a very long and exceptionally complex novel. But it’s worth the effort. Gray famously took thirty years to write Lanark; it took me almost as many to…