Scottish Literature

A Scottish ‘Ulysses’?

Lanark by Alasdair Gray

Alasdair Gray’s novel ‘Lanark’ is an astonishing achievement, and well worth the huge time investment to read it… This will be a long post, but then Alasdair Gray’s Lanark is, like James Joyce’s Ulysses, a very long and exceptionally complex novel. But it’s worth the effort. Gray famously took thirty years to write Lanark; it took me almost as many to…

Nature Obsessions…

A review of Otter Country by Miriam Darlington and Hare by Jim CrumleyMy fondness for nature writing does not abate. I put it down in part to the horrors of suburban existence – commuting, work, a feeling of disconnectedness with the land – and I’m certainly not alone: today’s nature writers are amongst the biggest…

Angus McPhee – The Silent Weaver

Photograph of cover of The Silent Weaver

The Silent Weaver: The Extraordinary Life and Work of Angus McPhee – Roger Hutchinson Angus McPhee’s story is remarkable – from the remote Outer Hebridean island of South Uist, he, like so many Gaels before and after him, signed up for the Army. He served in the Lovat Scouts and yet ended the Second World…

Who needs The Inbetweeners?

Sunset over Mull

So the Summer Holidays drew to a close with a visit to the cinema to see The Inbetweeners. Of course, I laughed throughout, not least at moments of painful self-recognition. It’s cleverly observed, shrewdly written and somewhere there’s compassion for the characters. But somewhere it’s also vacuous: after the booze and the bonks there’s not…